Guerrilla Skepticism on Wikipedia project – A discussion

I am a PhD researcher looking into how information is curated online. In particular I study how curation has moved from being the pursuit of a singular expert within an institution such a museum, gallery or archive, to a collective endeavour in which many “citizen curators” (a term that I am developing) work together to curate content both off and online. I’m looking at this curation in a very similar way to the Web 2.0 phenomena of the citizen journalist, where technology has opened by avenues of participatory, public driven projects in an unprecedented manner. With this in mind my research focuses quite heavily the larger Wikimedia project, so my interest was immediately piqued by the Guerrilla Skepticism on Wikipedia project.

Guerrilla Skepticism on Wikipedia project – A discussion

The Giant’s Causeway Visitor Centre – there I said it

This has been something that I have been meaning to write about for a long time, but between one thing and another it never happened. I have been spurred on to write this now as it has begun to dawn on me that people are beginning to use this as an example of the triumph of rationality in cultural institutions or is continuously trotted out as an example of how such institutions get science “wrong”.

The Giant’s Causeway Visitor Centre – there I said it

CONvergence 2013 (#cvg2013)

Hi All,

This is a bit of a cross post from my blog (www.ickletayto.com) re: my upcoming panels at  CONvergence in Minneapolis:


I’m heading to the twin cities for my most favourite of all the conventions (sorry OctoconCONvergence.

It’s all out geekery with books, films, radio plays, science, skepticism and party rooms.

I’m going to be on a number of panels, some of which are part of the SkepchickCon… So I’m super excited.

Here’s my “absolutely will be at as I am on the top table” schedule:

Thursday 4th July:

CONvergence 2013 (#cvg2013)

The Skeptical Humanities

I recently had a discussion on Twitter around the way in which skepticism can be applied to the world. The conversation was kicked off by a tweet of mine in which I linked to some blog posts about feminism, following on from this a very good blogger of Three Men make a Tiger fame posited that discussions about sexism, feminism or gender don’t necessarily belong within skeptical discourse.

The Skeptical Humanities

Your Right To Discuss Your Right to Die

With the country stunned into inaction ‘neath the dual icy caresses of arctic weather and plundering politicians, I thought it was only right to lighten the mood with a brief discussion of that most festive of topics, assisted suicide. This is an issue that has received a considerable amount of attention in the last couple of years in the UK, triggered in a large part by the actions of Debbie Purdy, a sufferer of multiple sclerosis who successfully argued that it was her human right to have clarification of the legal consequences to her husband if he was to be with her when she took her own life in a Dignitas clinic in Switzerland. The Crown Prosecution Service duly produced an interim report which vaguely suggested that as long as you were doing it for the right reasons, you were unlikely to face prosecution if you were with a loved one who has chosen to end their life.

Naturally such a topic as fundamental as our own mortality has lead to much discussion and debate, ranging from Terry Pratchett’s beautiful and moving Richard Dimbleby lecture to Cristina Odone’s and the Center for Policy Studies deeply disrespectful “report”. Whatever people’s position on the subject, there is currently an ongoing and dynamic dialogue in the UK. Unfortunately this does not seem to be the case in Ireland.

Your Right To Discuss Your Right to Die